The Great ShakeOut!

 A teacher demonstrates how to protect one's self in an earthquake to the children at Wu Yee Children's Services Lok Yuen Child Development Center

A teacher demonstrates how to protect one's self in an earthquake to the children at Wu Yee Children's Services Lok Yuen Child Development Center

On October 19, 2017 at exactly 10:19 am, over 18 million people participated in The Great ShakeOut, a global earthquake preparedness event.  The Great ShakeOut is an opportunity to learn and practice what to do before, during, and after an earthquake.

All Wu Yee Children's Services offices and Child Development Centers participated in the earthquake drill, which emphasized what Federal, state, and local emergency management experts and official preparedness organizations all agree on: “Drop, Cover, and Hold On".  

  • Drop where you are, onto your hands and knees. This position protects you from being knocked down and also allows you to stay low and crawl to shelter if nearby.

  • Cover your head and neck with one arm and hand, and stay on your knees bending over to protect vital organs.  

  • Hold on to shelter with one hand; be ready to move with your shelter if it shifts.  If not under shelter, hold on to your head and neck with both arms and hands.

So King Szeto, Family Advocate at Lok Yuen Child Development Center said all Wu Yee Child Development Centers participate in monthly earthquake and fire drills, so most children are familiar with the procedure.  "Some of them understand the seriousness, but the little ones may need a teacher to help them out", she said.

 Substitute teacher, Annie Li helps children drop, cover, and hold on

Substitute teacher, Annie Li helps children drop, cover, and hold on

The Earthquake Country Alliance, a public-private partnership of people, organizations, and regional alliances that work together to improve preparedness, mitigation and resiliency; recommends seven steps to earthquake safety.  In the third step, they recommend everyone to have disaster supplies kits stored in accessible locations at home, at work and in your vehicle. Having emergency supplies readily available can reduce the impact of an earthquake, a terrorist incident or other emergency on you and your family. Your disaster supplies kits should include:

  • Medications, prescription list, copies of medical cards, doctor’s name and contact information

  • Medical consent forms for dependents

  • First aid kit and handbook

  • Examination gloves (non-latex)

  • Dust mask

  • Spare eyeglasses or contact lenses and cleaning solution

  • Bottled water

  • Whistle (to alert rescuers to your location)

  • Sturdy shoes

  • Emergency cash

  • Road maps

  • List of emergency out-of-area contact phone numbers

  • Snack foods, high in water and calories

  • Working flashlight with extra batteries and light bulbs, or light sticks

  • Personal hygiene supplies

  • Comfort items such as games, crayons, writing materials, teddy bears

  • Toiletries and special provisions you need for yourself and others in your family including elderly, disabled, small children, and animals.

  • Copies of personal identification (drivers license, work ID card, etc.)